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A longitudinal and multicentre study of burnout and error in Irish junior doctors

Overview of attention for article published in Postgraduate Medical Journal, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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39 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
A longitudinal and multicentre study of burnout and error in Irish junior doctors
Published in
Postgraduate Medical Journal, June 2017
DOI 10.1136/postgradmedj-2016-134626
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul O’Connor, Sinéad Lydon, Angela O’Dea, Layla Hehir, Gozie Offiah, Akke Vellinga, Dara Byrne

Abstract

Junior doctors have been found to suffer from high levels of burnout. To measure burnout in a population of junior doctors in Ireland and identify if: levels of burnout are similar to US medical residents; there is a change in the pattern of burnout during the first year of postgraduate clinical practice; and burnout is associated with self-reported error. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey was distributed to Irish junior doctors from five training networks in the last quarter of 2015 when they were approximately 4 months into their first year of clinical practice (time 1), and again 6 months later (time 2). The survey assessed burnout and whether they had made a medical error that had 'played on (their) mind'. A total of 172 respondents out of 601 (28.6%) completed the questionnaire on both occasions. Irish junior doctors at time 2 were more burned out than a sample of US medical residents (72.6% and 60.3% burned out, respectively; p=0.001). There was a significant increase in emotional exhaustion from time 1 to time 2 (p=0.007). The association between burnout and error was significant at time 2 only (p=0.03). At time 2, of those respondents who were burned out, 81/122 (66.4%) reported making an error. A total of 22/46 (47.8%) of the junior doctors who were not burned out at time 2 reported an error. Current levels of burnout are unsustainable and place the health of both junior doctors and their patients at risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Other 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Unspecified 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 15 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 43%
Unspecified 9 23%
Psychology 5 13%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2018.
All research outputs
#590,920
of 13,398,555 outputs
Outputs from Postgraduate Medical Journal
#115
of 2,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,219
of 267,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Postgraduate Medical Journal
#4
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,398,555 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.