↓ Skip to main content

Cytokine treatment optimises the immunotherapeutic effects of umbilical cord-derived MSC for treatment of inflammatory liver disease

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cytokine treatment optimises the immunotherapeutic effects of umbilical cord-derived MSC for treatment of inflammatory liver disease
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0590-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha F. H. de Witte, Ana M. Merino, Marcella Franquesa, Tanja Strini, Johanna A. A. van Zoggel, Sander S. Korevaar, Franka Luk, Madhu Gargesha, Lisa O’Flynn, Debashish Roy, Steve J. Elliman, Philip N. Newsome, Carla C. Baan, Martin J. Hoogduijn

Abstract

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) possess immunomodulatory properties and low immunogenicity, both crucial properties for their development into an effective cellular immunotherapy. They have shown benefit in clinical trials targeting liver diseases; however the efficacy of MSC therapy will benefit from improvement of the immunomodulatory and immunogenic properties of MSC. MSC derived from human umbilical cords (ucMSC) were treated for 3 days in vitro with various inflammatory factors, interleukins, vitamins and serum deprivation. Their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory capacity were examined by gene-expression analysis, surface-marker expressions, IDO activity, PGE2 secretion and inhibition of T cell proliferation and IFNγ production. Furthermore, their activation of NK cell cytotoxicity was investigated via CD107a expression on NK cells. The immunomodulatory capacity, biodistribution and survival of pre-treated ucMSC were investigated in a CCl4-induced liver disease mouse model. In addition, capacity of pre-treated MSC to ameliorate liver inflammation was examined in an ex vivo liver inflammation co-culture model. IFN-γ and a multiple cytokine cocktail (MC) consisting of IFN-γ, TGFβ and retinoic acid upregulated the expression of immunomodulatory factor PD-L1 and IDO activity. Subsequently, both treatments enhanced the capacity of ucMSC to inhibit CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. The susceptibility of ucMSC for NK cell lysis was decreased by IFN-β, TGFβ and MC treatment. In vivo, no immunomodulation was observed by the ucMSC. Four hours after intravenous infusion in mice with CCl4-induced inflammatory liver injury, the majority of ucMSC were trapped in the lungs. Rapid clearance of ucMSC(VitB6), ucMSC(Starv + VitB6) and ucMSC(MC) and altered bio-distribution of ucMSC(TGFβ) compared to untreated ucMSC was observed. In the ex vivo co-culture system with inflammatory liver slices ucMSC(MC) showed significantly enhanced modulatory capacity compared to untreated ucMSC. The present study demonstrates the responsiveness of ucMSC to in vitro optimisation treatment. The observed improvements in immunomodulatory capacity as well as immunogenicity after MC treatment may improve the efficacy of ucMSC as immunotherapy targeted towards liver inflammation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 33%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,342,858
of 14,259,883 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#466
of 1,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,866
of 269,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#6
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,259,883 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,305 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,179 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.