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Myrteae phylogeny, calibration, biogeography and diversification patterns: Increased understanding in the most species rich tribe of Myrtaceae

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution, April 2017
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
181 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Myrteae phylogeny, calibration, biogeography and diversification patterns: Increased understanding in the most species rich tribe of Myrtaceae
Published in
Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ympev.2017.01.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thais N.C. Vasconcelos, Carol E.B. Proença, Berhaman Ahmad, Daniel S. Aguilar, Reinaldo Aguilar, Bruno S. Amorim, Keron Campbell, Itayguara R. Costa, Plauto S. De-Carvalho, Jair E.Q. Faria, Augusto Giaretta, Pepijn W. Kooij, Duane F. Lima, Fiorella F. Mazine, Brigido Peguero, Gerhard Prenner, Matheus F. Santos, Julia Soewarto, Astrid Wingler, Eve J. Lucas

Abstract

Myrteae (c. 2500 species; 51 genera) is the largest tribe of Myrtaceae and an ecologically important groups of angiosperms in the Neotropics. Systematic relationships in Myrteae are complex, hindering conservation initiatives and jeopardizing evolutionary modelling. A well-supported and robust phylogenetic hypothesis was here targeted towards a comprehensive understanding of the relationships within the tribe. The resultant topology was used as a base for key evolutionary analyses such as age estimation, historical biogeography and diversification rate patterns. One nuclear (ITS) and seven chloroplast (psbA-trnH, matK, ndhF, trnl-trnF, trnQ-rps16, rpl16 and rpl32-trnL) DNA regions for 115 taxa representing 46 out of the 51 genera in the tribe were accessed and analysed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference tools for phylogenetic reconstruction. Dates of diversification events were estimated and contrasted using two distinct fossil sets (macro and pollen) in BEAST. The subsequent dated phylogenies were compared and analysed for biogeographical patterns using BioGeoBEARS and diversification rates using BAMM. Myrteae phylogeny presents strong statistical support for three major clades within the tribe: Australasian group, Myrtus group and Main Neotropical Lineage. Dating results from calibration using macrofossil are an average of 20 million years older and show an early Paleocene origin of Myrteae, against a mid-Eocene one from the pollen fossil calibration. Biogeographic analysis shows the origin of Myrteae in Zealandia in both calibration approaches, followed by a widespread distribution throughout the still-linked Gondwana continents and diversification of Neotropical endemic lineages by later vicariance. Best configuration shift indicates three points of acceleration in diversification rates, all of them occurring in the Main Neotropical Lineage. Based on the reconstructed topology, several new taxonomic placements were recovered, including: the relative position of Myrtus communis, the placement of the Blepharocalyx group, the absence of generic endemism in the Caribbean, and the paraphyletism of the former Pimenta group. Distinct calibration approaches affect biogeography interpretation, increasing the number of necessary long distance dispersal events in the topology with older nodes. It is hypothesised that biological intrinsic factors such as modifications of embryo type and polyploidy might have played a role in accelerating shifts of diversification rates in Neotropical lineages. Future perspectives include formal subtribal classification, standardization of fossil calibration approaches and better links between diversification shifts and trait evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 180 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 29 16%
Student > Master 28 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 15%
Researcher 22 12%
Professor 16 9%
Other 27 15%
Unknown 32 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 102 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 11%
Environmental Science 10 6%
Chemistry 5 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 33 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2021.
All research outputs
#5,125,823
of 19,026,578 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution
#1,312
of 4,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,770
of 282,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution
#29
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,026,578 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,066 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.