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Salt tolerance of a wild ecotype of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) in southern China

Overview of attention for article published in Botanical Studies, October 2016
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Title
Salt tolerance of a wild ecotype of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) in southern China
Published in
Botanical Studies, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40529-016-0142-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wan-gou Liu, Jin-xiang Liu, Mei-ling Yao, Qi-fu Ma

Abstract

Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) is widely used in more than 120 countries for land management (e.g. rehabilitation of saline lands). A wild ecotype of vetiver grass was found in southern China in the 1950s, but little is known about its adaptability to saline stress. For the purpose of understanding its tolerance to salinity as well as corresponding tolerance mechanisms, in a greenhouse with natural lighting, seedlings were grown in culture solutions and subjected to a range of NaCl concentrations for 18 days. Compared to no NaCl treatment, 200 mM NaCl significantly reduced leaf water potential, leaf water content, leaf elongation rate, leaf photosynthetic rate and plant relative growth rate and increased leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content, but the parameters showed only slight reduction at 150 mM NaCl. In addition, salinity caused an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes in leaves. Moreover, increasing NaCl levels significantly increased Na(+) but decreased K(+) concentrations in both roots and leaves. The leaves had higher K(+) concentrations at all NaCl levels, but lower Na(+) concentrations compared to the roots, thereby maintaining higher K(+)/Na(+) ratio in leaves. Our results showed that the salinity threshold of this wild vetiver grass is about 100 mM NaCl, i.e. highly tolerant to salt stress. This wild vetiver grass has a high ability to exclude Na(+) and retain K(+) in its leaves, which is a critical strategy for salt tolerance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 22%
Researcher 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Master 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 9 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Engineering 4 15%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 7%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 10 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,059,274
of 11,342,318 outputs
Outputs from Botanical Studies
#63
of 92 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,133
of 267,589 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Botanical Studies
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 92 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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