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Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 3,683)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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315 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
575 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults
Published in
JAMA Internal Medicine, April 2014
DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.13563
Pubmed ID
Authors

Quanhe Yang, Zefeng Zhang, Edward W. Gregg, W. Dana Flanders, Robert Merritt, Frank B. Hu

Abstract

IMPORTANCE Epidemiologic studies have suggested that higher intake of added sugar is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Few prospective studies have examined the association of added sugar intake with CVD mortality. OBJECTIVE To examine time trends of added sugar consumption as percentage of daily calories in the United States and investigate the association of this consumption with CVD mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 1988-1994 [III], 1999-2004, and 2005-2010 [n = 31,147]) for the time trend analysis and NHANES III Linked Mortality cohort (1988-2006 [n = 11 733]), a prospective cohort of a nationally representative sample of US adults for the association study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cardiovascular disease mortality. RESULTS Among US adults, the adjusted mean percentage of daily calories from added sugar increased from 15.7% (95% CI, 15.0%-16.4%) in 1988-1994 to 16.8% (16.0%-17.7%; P = .02) in 1999-2004 and decreased to 14.9% (14.2%-15.5%; P < .001) in 2005-2010. Most adults consumed 10% or more of calories from added sugar (71.4%) and approximately 10% consumed 25% or more in 2005-2010. During a median follow-up period of 14.6 years, we documented 831 CVD deaths during 163,039 person-years. Age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CVD mortality across quintiles of the percentage of daily calories consumed from added sugar were 1.00 (reference), 1.09 (95% CI, 1.05-1.13), 1.23 (1.12-1.34), 1.49 (1.24-1.78), and 2.43 (1.63-3.62; P < .001), respectively. After additional adjustment for sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, HRs were 1.00 (reference), 1.07 (1.02-1.12), 1.18 (1.06-1.31), 1.38 (1.11-1.70), and 2.03 (1.26-3.27; P = .004), respectively. Adjusted HRs were 1.30 (95% CI, 1.09-1.55) and 2.75 (1.40-5.42; P = .004), respectively, comparing participants who consumed 10.0% to 24.9% or 25.0% or more calories from added sugar with those who consumed less than 10.0% of calories from added sugar. These findings were largely consistent across age group, sex, race/ethnicity (except among non-Hispanic blacks), educational attainment, physical activity, health eating index, and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Most US adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet. We observed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and increased risk for CVD mortality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 575 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Guatemala 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 556 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 119 21%
Student > Bachelor 99 17%
Researcher 88 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 63 11%
Unspecified 49 9%
Other 157 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 191 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 95 17%
Unspecified 67 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 64 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 8%
Other 112 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1994. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2019.
All research outputs
#816
of 13,628,786 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Internal Medicine
#17
of 3,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15
of 246,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Internal Medicine
#2
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,683 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 131.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,842 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.