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Fructose-rich diet and insulin action in female rat heart: Estradiol friend or foe?

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pharmacology, September 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
Fructose-rich diet and insulin action in female rat heart: Estradiol friend or foe?
Published in
European Journal of Pharmacology, September 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ejphar.2017.06.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maja Bundalo, Snjezana Romic, Snezana Tepavcevic, Mojca Stojiljkovic, Aleksandra Stankovic, Maja Zivkovic, Goran Koricanac

Abstract

Increased intake of fructose in humans and laboratory animals is demonstrated to be a risk factor for development of metabolic disorders (insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, estradiol is emphasized as a cardioprotective agent. The main goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on damaging cardiac effects of fructose-rich diet in females, mostly experimental animals, and to evaluate protective capacity of estradiol. Published results of our and other research groups indicate mostly detrimental effects of fructose-rich diet on cardiac insulin signaling molecules, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, nitric oxide production and ion transport, as well as renin-angiotensin system and inflammation. Some of these processes are involved in cardiac insulin signal transmission, others are regulated by insulin or have an influence on insulin action. Administration of estradiol to ovariectomized female rats, exposed to increased intake of fructose, was mostly beneficial to the heart, but sometimes it was ineffective or even detrimental, depending on the particular processes. We believe that these data, carefully translated to human population, could be useful for clinicians dealing with postmenopausal women susceptible to metabolic diseases and hormone replacement therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,842,517
of 12,231,598 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pharmacology
#5,238
of 5,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228,168
of 271,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pharmacology
#36
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,231,598 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,834 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.