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Antigen-specific regulatory T cells develop via the ICOS–ICOS-ligand pathway and inhibit allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Medicine, July 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
patent
7 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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628 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
147 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Antigen-specific regulatory T cells develop via the ICOS–ICOS-ligand pathway and inhibit allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity
Published in
Nature Medicine, July 2002
DOI 10.1038/nm745
Pubmed ID
Authors

Omid Akbari, Gordon J. Freeman, Everett H. Meyer, Edward A. Greenfield, Tammy T. Chang, Arlene H. Sharpe, Gerald Berry, Rosemarie H. DeKruyff, Dale T. Umetsu

Abstract

Asthma is caused by T-helper cell 2 (Th2)-driven immune responses, but the immunological mechanisms that protect against asthma development are poorly understood. T-cell tolerance, induced by respiratory exposure to allergen, can inhibit the development of airway hyperreactivity (AHR), a cardinal feature of asthma, and we show here that regulatory T (T(R)) cells can mediate this protective effect. Mature pulmonary dendritic cells in the bronchial lymph nodes of mice exposed to respiratory allergen induced the development of T(R) cells, in a process that required T-cell costimulation via the inducible costimulator (ICOS-ICOS-ligand pathway. The T(R) cells produced IL-10, and had potent inhibitory activity; when adoptively transferred into sensitized mice, T(R) cells blocked the development of AHR. Both the development and the inhibitory function of regulatory cells were dependent on the presence of IL-10 and on ICOS-ICOS-ligand interactions. These studies demonstrate that T(R) cells and the ICOS-ICOS-ligand signaling pathway are critically involved in respiratory tolerance and in downregulating pulmonary inflammation in asthma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Isle of Man 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 138 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 26%
Researcher 33 22%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Professor 9 6%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 12 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 50%
Immunology and Microbiology 23 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 17 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2019.
All research outputs
#2,306,008
of 14,346,974 outputs
Outputs from Nature Medicine
#3,363
of 6,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,207,165
of 13,557,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Medicine
#3,355
of 6,826 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,346,974 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,836 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,557,886 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,826 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.