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The spiritual history in outpatient practice: attitudes and practices of health professionals in the Adventist Health System

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, June 2017
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3 tweeters

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12 Dimensions

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56 Mendeley
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Title
The spiritual history in outpatient practice: attitudes and practices of health professionals in the Adventist Health System
Published in
BMC Medical Education, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0938-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harold G. Koenig, Kathleen Perno, Ted Hamilton

Abstract

A screening spiritual history (SSH) is how health professionals (HP) identify patients' spiritual values, beliefs and preferences (VBPs) in the outpatient setting. We report on attitudes and practices of HPs in the largest Protestant health system in the U.S., the Adventist Health System (AHS). Physicians or mid-level practitioners (N = 1082) in AHS-affiliated practices were approached and 513 (47%) agreed to participate. Participants were asked to identify a "spiritual care coordinator" (nurse/staff) and complete a questionnaire that assessed demographics, practice characteristics, religious involvement, and attitudes/practices concerning the SSH. Prevalence and predictors of attitudes/practices were identified. Questionnaires were completed by 427 physicians, 86 mid-level practitioners, and 224 nurses/staff (i.e., spiritual care coordinators). Among physicians, 45% agreed that HPs should take a SSH; of mid-level practitioners, 56% agreed; and of nurses/staff, 54% agreed. A significant proportion (range 31-54%) agreed that physicians should take the SSH. Participants indicated a SSH is appropriate for all outpatients (46-57%), well-visit exams (50-60%), the chronically ill (71-75%) and terminally ill (79-82%). A majority agreed the SSH should be documented in the medical record (67-80%). Few (11-17%) currently took a SSH, although most were at least sometimes willing to take a SSH (87-94%) or review the results thereof (86-98%). Self-rated importance of religion was the strongest predictor of SSH attitudes/practices. Many in the AHS say a SSH should be done, are willing to do it, and are willing to review the results, although few currently do so. Education, training, and support may help HPs identify and address patients' spiritual VBPs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 25%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 16 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 18%
Social Sciences 6 11%
Psychology 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 17 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,640,621
of 11,597,459 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#944
of 1,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,334
of 270,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#30
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,597,459 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.