↓ Skip to main content

Objectively measured short sleep duration and later sleep midpoint in pregnancy are associated with a higher risk of gestational diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Objectively measured short sleep duration and later sleep midpoint in pregnancy are associated with a higher risk of gestational diabetes
Published in
American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, October 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2017.05.066
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca L. Facco, William A. Grobman, Kathryn J. Reid, Corette B. Parker, Shannon M. Hunter, Robert M. Silver, Robert C. Basner, George R. Saade, Grace W. Pien, Shalini Manchanda, Judette M. Louis, Chia-Ling Nhan-Chang, Judith H. Chung, Deborah A. Wing, Hyagriv N. Simhan, David M. Haas, Jay Iams, Samuel Parry, Phyllis C. Zee

Abstract

Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that among non-pregnant adults, sleep duration may be an important risk factor for chronic disease. Although pregnant women commonly complain of poor sleep, few studies have objectively evaluated the quality of sleep in pregnancy or have explored the relationship between sleep disturbances and maternal and perinatal outcomes. Our objective was to examine the relationship between objectively assessed sleep duration, timing and continuity (measured via wrist actigraphy) and maternal cardiovascular and metabolic morbidity specific to pregnancy. This was a prospective cohort study of nulliparous women. Women were recruited between 16 0/7 and 21 6/7 weeks' gestation. They were asked to wear a wrist actigraphy monitor and to complete a daily sleep log for a seven consecutive-day period. The primary sleep exposure variables were the averages of the following over the total valid nights (minimum 5, maximum 7 nights): short sleep duration during the primary sleep period (< 7 hours/night), late sleep midpoint (midpoint between sleep onset and sleep offset > 5 AM), and top quartile of minutes of wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep fragmentation index. The primary outcomes of interest were a composite of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (mild, severe, or superimposed preeclampsia; eclampsia; or antepartum gestational hypertension) and gestational diabetes (GDM). Chi-square tests were used to assess associations between sleep variables and categorical baseline characteristics. Crude odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from univariate logistic regression models to characterize the magnitude of the relationship between sleep characteristics and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and GDM. For associations that were significant in univariate analysis, multiple logistic regression was used to explore further the association of sleep characteristics with pregnancy outcomes. Nine-hundred and one eligible women consented to participate. Of these women 782 submitted valid actigraphy studies. Short sleep duration and a later sleep midpoint were associated with an increased risk of GDM (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.11, 4.53; OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.24, 5.36, respectively) but not of hypertensive disorders. A model with both sleep duration and sleep midpoint as well as their interaction term revealed that while there was no significant interaction between these exposures, the main effects of both short sleep duration and later sleep midpoint with GDM remained significant (aOR 2.06, 95% CI 1.01, 4.19; aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.13, 4.97, respectively). Additionally, after adjusting separately for age, BMI and race/ethnicity, both short sleep duration and later sleep midpoint remained associated with GDM. No associations were demonstrated between the sleep quality measures (WASO, sleep fragmentation) and hypertensive disorders or GDM. Our results demonstrate a relationship between short sleep duration and later sleep midpoint with GDM. Our data suggest independent contributions of these two sleep characteristics to the risk for GDM in nulliparous women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 16%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 19 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 33%
Psychology 10 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 27 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2017.
All research outputs
#994,590
of 13,194,193 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
#1,001
of 8,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,225
of 267,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
#45
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,194,193 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,813 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.