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Using genotyping to delineate tuberculosis transmission in long-term care facilities: single facility 4-year experience

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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Title
Using genotyping to delineate tuberculosis transmission in long-term care facilities: single facility 4-year experience
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2526-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wen-Cheng Chao, Pei-Chun Chuang, Don-Han Wu, Chieh-Liang Wu, Po-Yu Liu, Chi-Chang Shieh, Ruwen Jou

Abstract

Residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are vulnerable to tuberculosis (TB) transmission; however, to delineate possible routes of TB transmission in LTCFs is difficult. This study aimed to address the use of regular genotyping surveillance to delineate TB transmission in LTCFs. All of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in the reported 620-bed LTCF between July 2011 and August 2015 were genotyped, and we retrospectively compared epidemiological data and genotyping results. A total of 42 subjects were diagnosed with culture-positive pulmonary TB infection during the 4-year period. Their median age was 76.5 years, and 64.3% (27/42) of them were male. Genotyping identified 5 clustered TB infections involving 76.2% (32/42) of all TB subjects. In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and body mass index, subjects with clustered TB infection were less likely to be Activities of Daily Living (ADL)-dependence (adjOR 0.073, 95% CI 0.007-0.758) when compared with subjects having individual TB infections. Prolonged surveillance is essential given that the median interval to diagnose secondary subjects was 673 days. Finally, only 63.0% (17/27) of the 27 secondary TB subjects in this study had contact history with index subject in the same ward. In conclusion, possible routes of TB transmission in a complex TB outbreak at LTCFs might be delineated by routine genotyping surveillance and regular health check-up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 41%
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Master 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Other 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 47%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 18%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,102,977
of 11,370,524 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,044
of 4,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,461
of 267,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#71
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,524 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,222 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,272 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.