TEMPORARY REMOVAL: Structural stigma and all-cause mortality in sexual minority populations.

Overview of attention for article published in Social Science & Medicine, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 3,350)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
47 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
Title
TEMPORARY REMOVAL: Structural stigma and all-cause mortality in sexual minority populations.
Published in
Social Science & Medicine, January 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.06.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hatzenbuehler ML, Bellatorre A, Lee Y, Finch B, Muennig P, Fiscella K, Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, Anna Bellatorre, Yeonjin Lee, Brian Finch, Peter Muennig, Kevin Fiscella

Abstract

Stigma operates at multiple levels, including intrapersonal appraisals (e.g., self-stigma), interpersonal events (e.g., hate crimes), and structural conditions (e.g., community norms, institutional policies). Although prior research has indicated that intrapersonal and interpersonal forms of stigma negatively affect the health of the stigmatized, few studies have addressed the health consequences of exposure to structural forms of stigma. To address this gap, we investigated whether structural stigma-operationalized as living in communities with high levels of anti-gay prejudice-increases risk of premature mortality for sexual minorities. We constructed a measure capturing the average level of anti-gay prejudice at the community level, using data from the General Social Survey, which was then prospectively linked to all-cause mortality data via the National Death Index. Sexual minorities living in communities with high levels of anti-gay prejudice experienced a higher hazard of mortality than those living in low-prejudice communities (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 3.03, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.50, 6.13), controlling for individual and community-level covariates. This result translates into a shorter life expectancy of approximately 12 years (95% C.I.: 4-20 years) for sexual minorities living in high-prejudice communities. Analysis of specific causes of death revealed that suicide, homicide/violence, and cardiovascular diseases were substantially elevated among sexual minorities in high-prejudice communities. Strikingly, there was an 18-year difference in average age of completed suicide between sexual minorities in the high-prejudice (age 37.5) and low-prejudice (age 55.7) communities. These results highlight the importance of examining structural forms of stigma and prejudice as social determinants of health and longevity among minority populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 10%
Italy 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
PR 1 1%
Unknown 89 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 28%
Student > Master 18 17%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 41 39%
Psychology 33 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 20%
Arts and Humanities 3 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 4 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 125. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2016.
All research outputs
#35,792
of 5,482,570 outputs
Outputs from Social Science & Medicine
#22
of 3,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,435
of 149,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Social Science & Medicine
#1
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,482,570 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 149,531 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.