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Analysis of factors that affect the precision of the radiographic lateral femoral bowing angle using a three-dimensional computed tomography-based modelling technique

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, June 2017
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Title
Analysis of factors that affect the precision of the radiographic lateral femoral bowing angle using a three-dimensional computed tomography-based modelling technique
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13018-017-0588-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ye-Ran Li, Yu-Hang Gao, Xin Qi, Jian-Guo Liu, Lu Ding, Chen Yang, Zheng Zhang, Shu-Qiang Li

Abstract

Precise measurement of lateral femoral bowing is important to achieve postoperative lower limb alignment. We aimed to investigate factors that affect the precision of the radiographic lateral femoral bowing (RLFB) angle using three-dimensional (3D) models and whether the angle affects surgery design. Forty femurs in total were divided into two groups based on their preoperative RLFB angle. The flexion contracture angle, preoperative and postoperative RLFB angles, and intersection angle between the mechanical and anatomical axes were compared. The angle between the arc and sagittal planes, varus and valgus angles, and intersection angle between the mechanical and anatomical axes were measured on a 3D model. There was no significant between-group difference in 3D model measurements of the angle between the arc and sagittal planes (p = 0.327). There was no significant difference between the mechanical and anatomical axes measured by both imaging modalities (p > 0.258). When the RLFB was >5°, the flexion contracture angle and radiographic femoral bowing angle were positively correlated (r = 0.535, p < 0.05). Distal femur varus and valgus angles significantly differed between the two groups (p = 0.01). After total knee arthroplasty, the radiographic femoral bowing angle decreased significantly. When the cases' radiographic femoral bowing angle is larger and the angle between the arc and sagittal planes is smaller as measured in 3D models, the angle between the arc and coronal planes is larger. The radiographic femoral bowing angle does not reflect the actual size of lateral femoral bowing, does not greatly affect surgery design, and is greatly affected by flexion contracture deformity. A RLFB angle larger than 15° indicates real lateral femoral bowing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Professor 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,102,977
of 11,370,524 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#368
of 531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,019
of 266,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#25
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,524 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 531 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.