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Whitebark Pine, Population Density, and Home-Range Size of Grizzly Bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, February 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Whitebark Pine, Population Density, and Home-Range Size of Grizzly Bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Published in
PLoS ONE, February 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0088160
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel D. Bjornlie, Frank T. Van Manen, Michael R. Ebinger, Mark A. Haroldson, Daniel J. Thompson, Cecily M. Costello

Abstract

Changes in life history traits of species can be an important indicator of potential factors influencing populations. For grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), recent decline of whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis), an important fall food resource, has been paired with a slowing of population growth following two decades of robust population increase. These observations have raised questions whether resource decline or density-dependent processes may be associated with changes in population growth. Distinguishing these effects based on changes in demographic rates can be difficult. However, unlike the parallel demographic responses expected from both decreasing food availability and increasing population density, we hypothesized opposing behavioral responses of grizzly bears with regard to changes in home-range size. We used the dynamic changes in food resources and population density of grizzly bears as a natural experiment to examine hypotheses regarding these potentially competing influences on grizzly bear home-range size. We found that home-range size did not increase during the period of whitebark pine decline and was not related to proportion of whitebark pine in home ranges. However, female home-range size was negatively associated with an index of population density. Our data indicate that home-range size of grizzly bears in the GYE is not associated with availability of WBP, and, for female grizzly bears, increasing population density may constrain home-range size.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 67%
Environmental Science 11 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2014.
All research outputs
#2,982,994
of 6,743,156 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#51,989
of 101,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,644
of 190,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,850
of 8,410 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,743,156 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 101,088 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,173 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8,410 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.