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Evaluation of a proposal for reliable low-cost grid power with 100% wind, water, and solar

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
43 news outlets
blogs
21 blogs
twitter
567 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
180 Mendeley
Title
Evaluation of a proposal for reliable low-cost grid power with 100% wind, water, and solar
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1610381114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher T. M Clack, Staffan A. Qvist, Jay Apt, Morgan Bazilian, Adam R. Brandt, Ken Caldeira, Steven J. Davis, Victor Diakov, Mark A. Handschy, Paul D. H. Hines, Paulina Jaramillo, Daniel M. Kammen, Jane C. S. Long, M. Granger Morgan, Adam Reed, Varun Sivaram, James Sweeney, George R. Tynan, David G. Victor, John P. Weyant, Jay F. Whitacre, Clack, Christopher T M, Qvist, Staffan A, Apt, Jay, Bazilian, Morgan, Brandt, Adam R, Caldeira, Ken, Davis, Steven J, Diakov, Victor, Handschy, Mark A, Hines, Paul D H, Jaramillo, Paulina, Kammen, Daniel M, Long, Jane C S, Morgan, M Granger, Reed, Adam, Sivaram, Varun, Sweeney, James, Tynan, George R, Victor, David G, Weyant, John P, Whitacre, Jay F, Christopher T. M. Clack, Clack, Christopher T. M., Qvist, Staffan A., Brandt, Adam R., Davis, Steven J., Handschy, Mark A., Hines, Paul D. H., Kammen, Daniel M., Long, Jane C. S., Morgan, M. Granger, Tynan, George R., Victor, David G., Weyant, John P., Whitacre, Jay F.

Abstract

A number of analyses, meta-analyses, and assessments, including those performed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the International Energy Agency, have concluded that deployment of a diverse portfolio of clean energy technologies makes a transition to a low-carbon-emission energy system both more feasible and less costly than other pathways. In contrast, Jacobson et al. [Jacobson MZ, Delucchi MA, Cameron MA, Frew BA (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(49):15060-15065] argue that it is feasible to provide "low-cost solutions to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of WWS [wind, water and solar power] across all energy sectors in the continental United States between 2050 and 2055", with only electricity and hydrogen as energy carriers. In this paper, we evaluate that study and find significant shortcomings in the analysis. In particular, we point out that this work used invalid modeling tools, contained modeling errors, and made implausible and inadequately supported assumptions. Policy makers should treat with caution any visions of a rapid, reliable, and low-cost transition to entire energy systems that relies almost exclusively on wind, solar, and hydroelectric power.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 567 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 178 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 26%
Researcher 42 23%
Student > Master 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 8%
Other 12 7%
Other 43 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 37 21%
Environmental Science 31 17%
Energy 23 13%
Unspecified 20 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 7%
Other 57 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 911. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,659
of 8,936,948 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#108
of 48,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224
of 253,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#12
of 1,000 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,936,948 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,490 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,000 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.