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Breast cancer patient delay in Fukushima, Japan following the 2011 triple disaster: a long-term retrospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 X users
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
Breast cancer patient delay in Fukushima, Japan following the 2011 triple disaster: a long-term retrospective study
Published in
BMC Cancer, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3412-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akihiko Ozaki, Shuhei Nomura, Claire Leppold, Masaharu Tsubokura, Tetsuya Tanimoto, Takeru Yokota, Shigehira Saji, Toyoaki Sawano, Manabu Tsukada, Tomohiro Morita, Sae Ochi, Shigeaki Kato, Masahiro Kami, Tsuyoshi Nemoto, Yukio Kanazawa, Hiromichi Ohira

Abstract

Little information is available concerning how patient delay may be affected by mass disasters. The main objectives of the present study are to identify whether there was a post-disaster increase in the risk of experiencing patient delay among breast cancer patients in an area affected by the 2011 triple disaster in Fukushima, Japan, and to elucidate factors associated with post-disaster patient delay. Sociodemographic factors (age, employment status, cohabitant status and evacuation status), health characteristics, and health access- and disaster-related factors were specifically considered. Records of symptomatic breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2005 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for patient delay in every year post-disaster compared with the pre-disaster baseline. Total and excessive patient delays were respectively defined as three months or more and twelve months or more from symptom recognition to first medical consultation. Logistic regression analysis was conducted for pre- and post-disaster patient delay in order to reveal any factors potentially associated with patient delay, and changes after the disaster. Two hundred nineteen breast cancer patients (122 pre-disaster and 97 post-disaster) were included. After adjustments for age, significant post-disaster increases in RRs of experiencing both total (RR: 1.66, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.02-2.70, p < 0.05) and excessive patient delay (RR: 4.49, 95% CI: 1.73-11.65, p < 0.01) were observed. The RRs for total patient delay peaked in the fourth year post-disaster, and significant increases in the risk of excessive patient delay were observed in the second, fourth, and fifth years post-disaster, with more than five times the risk observed pre-disaster. A family history of any cancer was the only factor significantly associated with total patient delay post-disaster (odds ratio: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15-0.95, p < 0.05), while there were no variables associated with delay pre-disaster. The triple disaster in Fukushima appears to have led to an increased risk of patient delay among breast cancer patients, and this trend has continued for five years following the disaster.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Master 11 13%
Other 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 21 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 20%
Psychology 9 11%
Environmental Science 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 26 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2023.
All research outputs
#2,020,685
of 24,938,276 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#317
of 8,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,417
of 322,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#10
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,938,276 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,826 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.