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‘It’s a hard conversation to have’. Healthcare professionals’ views concerning advance care discussions with young people affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases: an interview study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
‘It’s a hard conversation to have’. Healthcare professionals’ views concerning advance care discussions with young people affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases: an interview study
Published in
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , June 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmjspcare-2017-001369
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andy Hiscock, Stephen Barclay

Abstract

Life-limiting neuromuscular disease, such as some of the muscular dystrophies, are often diagnosed in early childhood: when death comes, commonly in the second or third decade of life, patients rarely have advance care plans in place or documented end-of-life care preferences. There is very limited literature concerning the discussions about end-of-life plans healthcare professionals have with young people affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the views and experiences of healthcare professionals concerning having discussions about advance care plans and end-of-life care with teenagers and young adult patients affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases. Semistructured interviews with a maximum variety sample of nine professionals involved in the care of young people with life-limiting neuromuscular diseases in one region of the UK. While recognising the inevitable progression of the conditions, there was no consensus among interviewees concerning best approaches to discuss end-of-life care plans. Several environmental and personal barriers were identified that lead to avoidance of the emotionally challenging and difficult conversations. Community-based professionals with well-established relationships with patients and families may be best placed to take the lead and coordinate discussions, but individual case-by-case preferences need to be carefully considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 33%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Social Sciences 3 20%
Psychology 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,675,938
of 11,638,207 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#234
of 841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,270
of 267,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#23
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,638,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,122 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.