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KAPS (kinematic assessment of passive stretch): a tool to assess elbow flexor and extensor spasticity after stroke using a robotic exoskeleton

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, June 2017
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86 Mendeley
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Title
KAPS (kinematic assessment of passive stretch): a tool to assess elbow flexor and extensor spasticity after stroke using a robotic exoskeleton
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12984-017-0272-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Centen, Catherine R. Lowrey, Stephen H. Scott, Ting-Ting Yeh, George Mochizuki, Andrew Centen, Catherine R. Lowrey, Stephen H. Scott, Ting-Ting Yeh, George Mochizuki

Abstract

Spasticity is a common sequela of stroke. Traditional assessment methods include relatively coarse scales that may not capture all characteristics of elevated muscle tone. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a tool to quantitatively assess post-stroke spasticity in the upper extremity. Ninety-six healthy individuals and 46 individuals with stroke participated in this study. The kinematic assessment of passive stretch (KAPS) protocol consisted of passive elbow stretch in flexion and extension across an 80° range in 5 movement durations. Seven parameters were identified and assessed to characterize spasticity (peak velocity, final angle, creep (or release), between-arm peak velocity difference, between-arm final angle, between-arm creep, and between-arm catch angle). The fastest movement duration (600 ms) was most effective at identifying impairment in each parameter associated with spasticity. A decrease in peak velocity during passive stretch between the affected and unaffected limb was most effective at identifying individuals as impaired. Spasticity was also associated with a decreased passive range (final angle) and a classic 'catch and release' as seen through between-arm catch and creep metrics. The KAPS protocol and robotic technology can provide a sensitive and quantitative assessment of post-stroke elbow spasticity not currently attainable through traditional measures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 86 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 17%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Researcher 7 8%
Other 7 8%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 21 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 18 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 14%
Neuroscience 7 8%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 28 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,093,687
of 11,389,380 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#366
of 602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,397
of 263,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#10
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,389,380 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.