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Moving forward in circles: challenges and opportunities in modelling population cycles

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
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Title
Moving forward in circles: challenges and opportunities in modelling population cycles
Published in
Ecology Letters, June 2017
DOI 10.1111/ele.12789
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frédéric Barraquand, Stilianos Louca, Karen C. Abbott, Christina A. Cobbold, Flora Cordoleani, Donald L. DeAngelis, Bret D. Elderd, Jeremy W. Fox, Priscilla Greenwood, Frank M. Hilker, Dennis L. Murray, Christopher R. Stieha, Rachel A. Taylor, Kelsey Vitense, Gail S.K. Wolkowicz, Rebecca C. Tyson

Abstract

Population cycling is a widespread phenomenon, observed across a multitude of taxa in both laboratory and natural conditions. Historically, the theory associated with population cycles was tightly linked to pairwise consumer-resource interactions and studied via deterministic models, but current empirical and theoretical research reveals a much richer basis for ecological cycles. Stochasticity and seasonality can modulate or create cyclic behaviour in non-intuitive ways, the high-dimensionality in ecological systems can profoundly influence cycling, and so can demographic structure and eco-evolutionary dynamics. An inclusive theory for population cycles, ranging from ecosystem-level to demographic modelling, grounded in observational or experimental data, is therefore necessary to better understand observed cyclical patterns. In turn, by gaining better insight into the drivers of population cycles, we can begin to understand the causes of cycle gain and loss, how biodiversity interacts with population cycling, and how to effectively manage wildly fluctuating populations, all of which are growing domains of ecological research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 25%
Researcher 24 25%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Unspecified 6 6%
Other 22 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 44%
Environmental Science 25 26%
Unspecified 16 16%
Mathematics 3 3%
Physics and Astronomy 3 3%
Other 7 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,356,537
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#890
of 2,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,012
of 264,799 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#28
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,799 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.