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Transportation noise exposure and cardiovascular mortality: a nationwide cohort study from Switzerland

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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2 Mendeley
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Title
Transportation noise exposure and cardiovascular mortality: a nationwide cohort study from Switzerland
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10654-017-0234-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harris Héritier, Danielle Vienneau, Maria Foraster, Ikenna Collins Eze, Emmanuel Schaffner, Laurie Thiesse, Franziska Rudzik, Manuel Habermacher, Micha Köpfli, Reto Pieren, Mark Brink, Christian Cajochen, Jean Marc Wunderli, Nicole Probst-Hensch, Martin Röösli

Abstract

Most studies published to date consider single noise sources and the reported noise metrics are not informative about the peaking characteristics of the source under investigation. Our study focuses on the association between cardiovascular mortality in Switzerland and the three major transportation noise sources-road, railway and aircraft traffic-along with a novel noise metric termed intermittency ratio (IR), expressing the percentage contribution of individual noise events to the total noise energy from all sources above background levels. We generated Swiss-wide exposure models for road, railway and aircraft noise for 2001. Noise from the most exposed façade was linked to geocodes at the residential floor height for each of the 4.41 million adult (>30 y) Swiss National Cohort participants. For the follow-up period 2000-2008, we investigated the association between all noise exposure variables [Lden(Road), Lden(Rail), Lden(Air), and IR at night] and various cardiovascular primary causes of death by multipollutant Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders including NO2. The most consistent associations were seen for myocardial infarction: adjusted hazard ratios (HR) (95% CI) per 10 dB increase of exposure were 1.038 (1.019-1.058), 1.018 (1.004-1.031), and 1.026 (1.004-1.048) respectively for Lden(Road), Lden(Rail), and Lden(Air). In addition, total IR at night played a role: HRs for CVD were non-significant in the 1st, 2nd and 5th quintiles whereas they were 1.019 (1.002-1.037) and 1.021 (1.003-1.038) for the 3rd and 4th quintiles. Our study demonstrates the impact of all major transportation noise sources on cardiovascular diseases. Mid-range IR levels at night (i.e. between continuous and highly intermittent) are potentially more harmful than continuous noise levels of the same average level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 1 50%
Unknown 1 50%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 650%
Researcher 13 650%
Student > Bachelor 12 600%
Unspecified 12 600%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 350%
Other 14 700%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 23 1150%
Environmental Science 12 600%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 500%
Engineering 5 250%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 250%
Other 16 800%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2018.
All research outputs
#728,366
of 13,703,906 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#102
of 1,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,791
of 264,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#4
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,703,906 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,826 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.