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Mercury in the Soil of Two Contrasting Watersheds in the Eastern United States

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Mercury in the Soil of Two Contrasting Watersheds in the Eastern United States
Published in
PLoS ONE, February 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086855
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas A. Burns, Laurel G. Woodruff, Paul M. Bradley, William F. Cannon

Abstract

Soil represents the largest store of mercury (Hg) in terrestrial ecosystems, and further study of the factors associated with soil Hg storage is needed to address concerns about the magnitude and persistence of global environmental Hg bioaccumulation. To address this need, we compared total Hg and methyl Hg concentrations and stores in the soil of different landscapes in two watersheds in different geographic settings with similar and relatively high methyl Hg concentrations in surface waters and biota, Fishing Brook, Adirondack Mountains, New York, and McTier Creek, Coastal Plain, South Carolina. Median total Hg concentrations and stores in organic and mineral soil samples were three-fold greater at Fishing Brook than at McTier Creek. Similarly, median methyl Hg concentrations were about two-fold greater in Fishing Brook soil than in McTier Creek soil, but this difference was significant only for mineral soil samples, and methyl Hg stores were not significantly different among these watersheds. In contrast, the methyl Hg/total Hg ratio was significantly greater at McTier Creek suggesting greater climate-driven methylation efficiency in the Coastal Plain soil than that of the Adirondack Mountains. The Adirondack soil had eight-fold greater soil organic matter than that of the Coastal Plain, consistent with greater total Hg stores in the northern soil, but soil organic matter - total Hg relations differed among the sites. A strong linear relation was evident at McTier Creek (r(2) = 0.68; p<0.001), but a linear relation at Fishing Brook was weak (r(2) = 0.13; p<0.001) and highly variable across the soil organic matter content range, suggesting excess Hg binding capacity in the Adirondack soil. These results suggest greater total Hg turnover time in Adirondack soil than that of the Coastal Plain, and that future declines in stream water Hg concentrations driven by declines in atmospheric Hg deposition will be more gradual and prolonged in the Adirondacks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 27 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 27%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Unspecified 4 13%
Professor 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 13 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Unspecified 5 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,827,575
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#35,419
of 140,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,985
of 187,331 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,349
of 5,174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 140,092 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,331 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.