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The perception of parents and teachers about intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in school children in a semi-rural area of Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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48 Mendeley
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Title
The perception of parents and teachers about intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in school children in a semi-rural area of Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1670-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Junior R. Matangila, Jessica Fraeyman, Marie-Louise Mbula Kambulu, Alain Mpanya, Raquel Inocêncio da Luz, Pascal Lutumba, Jean-Pierre Van Geertruyden, Hilde Bastiaens

Abstract

Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) is likely to be the most promising therapeutic strategy to prevent malaria and its related adverse outcomes in schoolchildren. However, its successful implementation will depend on acceptability to key stakeholders such as parents and teachers. A qualitative research was conducted, following a clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of IPT in schoolchildren (IPTsc), to understand the perceptions and experiences of parents and teachers with IPTsc, in two schools of Mokali, in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Eighty parents participated in 8 focus group discussions and 6 school staff were involved in 6 semi-structured interviews. Parents experiences with IPTsc divided them into two groups (owning positive experiences and owning negative experiences with IPTsc). Three major themes emerged as key factors associated with reluctance of parents to IPT use in schoolchildren. These included wrong malaria-related knowledge, bad experience with IPTsc administered during the trial and misunderstanding of IPTsc. The school staff were generally willing to be trained to give medicine to schoolchildren within the scope of IPT. However, most parents were more comfortable with the use of health workers than teachers for drug administration. More importantly, all parents accepting IPT suggested to diagnose malaria infection before any administration of IPT, which is not in line with IPT principal. These results suggest that more efforts are needed to improve overall malaria-related knowledge in the community, specifically chemo-prevention strategies and the safety of the drugs used, to ensure the success of health interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 27%
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 25%
Social Sciences 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,100,222
of 11,400,239 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,503
of 3,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,236
of 263,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#123
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,400,239 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,366 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.