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Differential protein expression in chicken macrophages and heterophils in vivo following infection with Salmonella Enteritidis

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, June 2017
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2 tweeters

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Differential protein expression in chicken macrophages and heterophils in vivo following infection with Salmonella Enteritidis
Published in
Veterinary Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13567-017-0439-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zuzana Sekelova, Hana Stepanova, Ondrej Polansky, Karolina Varmuzova, Marcela Faldynova, Radek Fedr, Ivan Rychlik, Lenka Vlasatikova

Abstract

In this study we compared the proteomes of macrophages and heterophils isolated from the spleen 4 days after intravenous infection of chickens with Salmonella Enteritidis. Heterophils were characterized by expression of MMP9, MRP126, LECT2, CATHL1, CATHL2, CATHL3, LYG2, LYZ and RSFR. Macrophages specifically expressed receptor proteins, e.g. MRC1L, LRP1, LGALS1, LRPAP1 and a DMBT1L. Following infection, heterophils decreased ALB and FN1, and released MMP9 to enable their translocation to the site of infection. In addition, the endoplasmic reticulum proteins increased in heterophils which resulted in the release of granular proteins. Since transcription of genes encoding granular proteins did not decrease, these genes remained continuously transcribed and translated even after initial degranulation. Macrophages increased amounts of fatty acid elongation pathway proteins, lysosomal and phagosomal proteins. Macrophages were less responsive to acute infection than heterophils and an increase in proteins like CATHL1, CATHL2, RSFR, LECT2 and GAL1 in the absence of any change in their expression at RNA level could even be explained by capturing these proteins from the external environment into which these could have been released by heterophils.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 36%
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Environmental Science 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,112,814
of 11,421,045 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#453
of 731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,527
of 263,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,421,045 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 731 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.