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Deciding about nursing home care in dementia: A conjoint analysis of how older people balance competing goals

Overview of attention for article published in Geriatrics & Gerontology International, June 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Deciding about nursing home care in dementia: A conjoint analysis of how older people balance competing goals
Published in
Geriatrics & Gerontology International, June 2017
DOI 10.1111/ggi.13096
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alison Fahey, Dearbhail Ní Chaoimh, Grainne R. Mulkerrin, Eamon C. Mulkerrin, Shaun T. O'Keeffe

Abstract

"Don't put me in a home" is a common preference of older people, but so too is "I don't want to be a burden on my family." These and other goals often conflict with each other when people have worsening dementia and the issue of possible nursing home admission arises. Community-dwelling older hospital patients were asked to imagine that they lived alone, had dementia and were experiencing increasing practical difficulties, and were presented with 11 possible "outcome packages." Conjoint analysis was used to investigate how participants ranked possible outcomes and traded-off between these factors: place of residence (home or nursing home), burden on their family, risk of harm and duration of life. Of 122 potential participants, 102 inpatients aged 65-80 years completed the study. Of these participants, 46 (46%) patients give the greatest weight to reducing the burden on their family, 39 (39%) to remaining at home, 11 (11%) to minimizing the risk of harm and five (5%) to maximizing the length of life. There were no significant clinical or demographic differences between these groups. There was a strong negative correlation (Spearman's rho -0.59, P < 0.0001) between importance scores for place of residence and for burden on family. There are important differences in how individual older people would balance the competing priorities of reducing the burden on their family and remaining at home in the event of developing dementia. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Librarian 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 20 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Psychology 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 20 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2017.
All research outputs
#8,558,023
of 14,927,623 outputs
Outputs from Geriatrics & Gerontology International
#430
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,697
of 267,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Geriatrics & Gerontology International
#14
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,927,623 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.