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Spatially resolved metabolic analysis reveals a central role for transcriptional control in carbon allocation to wood

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Botany, June 2017
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Spatially resolved metabolic analysis reveals a central role for transcriptional control in carbon allocation to wood
Published in
Journal of Experimental Botany, June 2017
DOI 10.1093/jxb/erx200
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melissa Roach, Stéphanie Arrivault, Amir Mahboubi, Nicole Krohn, Ronan Sulpice, Mark Stitt, Totte Niittylä

Abstract

The contribution of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation to modifying carbon allocation to developing wood of trees is not well defined. To clarify the role of transcriptional regulation, the enzyme activity patterns of eight central primary metabolism enzymes across phloem, cambium, and developing wood of aspen (Populus tremula L.) were compared with transcript levels obtained by RNA sequencing of sequential stem sections from the same trees. Enzymes were selected on the basis of their importance in sugar metabolism and in linking primary metabolism to lignin biosynthesis. Existing enzyme assays were adapted to allow measurements from ~1 mm3 sections of dissected stem tissue. These experiments provided high spatial resolution of enzyme activity changes across different stages of wood development, and identified the gene transcripts probably responsible for these changes. In most cases, there was a clear positive relationship between transcripts and enzyme activity. During secondary cell wall formation, the increases in transcript levels and enzyme activities also matched with increased levels of glucose, fructose, hexose phosphates, and UDP-glucose, emphasizing an important role for transcriptional regulation in carbon allocation to developing aspen wood. These observations corroborate the efforts to increase carbon allocation to wood by engineering gene regulatory networks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Other 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 27%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Chemistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,168,171
of 11,435,137 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Botany
#1,163
of 3,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,206
of 262,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Botany
#77
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,137 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,892 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,960 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.