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Treatment delay and fatal outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis in advanced age: a retrospective nationwide cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment delay and fatal outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis in advanced age: a retrospective nationwide cohort study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2554-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chih-Hsin Lee, Jann-Yuan Wang, Hsien-Chun Lin, Pai-Yang Lin, Jer-Hwa Chang, Chi-Won Suk, Li-Na Lee, Chou-Chin Lan, Kuan-Jen Bai

Abstract

Studies focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in advanced age (≥80 years) are lacking. This study aimed to explore treatment delay, outcomes and their predictors in this group. Adult (≥20 years) patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2004 to 2009. Treatment completion and mortality rates were noted at one year after treatment. Among the 81,081 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis identified, 13,923 (17.2%) were aged ≥80 years, and 26,897 (33.2%) were aged 65-79 years. The treatment completion, mortality rates and treatment delay were 54.8%, 34.7% and 61 (12-128) [median, (1st-3rd quartiles)] days in patients aged ≥80 years, 68.3%, 18.5% and 53 (8-122) days in patients aged 65-79 years, and 78.9%, 6.5% and 21 (1-84) days in patients aged <65 years, respectively. The elder patients were more likely to receive second-line anti-tuberculosis agents. The treatment completion rate decreased with older age, female sex, comorbidities, low income, requiring second-line anti-tuberculosis agents, severity of pulmonary tuberculosis and longer treatment delay. Older age, female sex, comorbidities, low income, and not undergoing rapid molecular diagnostic tests were independently associated with longer treatment delays. Pulmonary tuberculosis in advanced age has a longer treatment delay and a higher mortality rate. Applying rapid molecular diagnostic tools may reduce treatment delay and should be integrated into the diagnostic algorithm for pulmonary tuberculosis, particularly in elderly patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Other 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,832,250
of 11,419,765 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,151
of 4,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,636
of 262,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#47
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,419,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,243 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.