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Association between oral health status and central obesity among Brazilian independent-living elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
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Title
Association between oral health status and central obesity among Brazilian independent-living elderly
Published in
Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1590/1807-3107bor-2016.vol30.0116
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carla Thais Rosada PERUCHI, Regina Célia POLI-FREDERICO, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel CARDELLI, Marina de Lourdes Calvo FRACASSO, Carina Gisele Costa BISPO, Rejane Dias NEVES-SOUZA, Jefferson Rosa CARDOSO, Sandra Mara MACIEL

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between oral health status and central obesity (CO) in Brazilian independent-living elderly. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 489 elderly, who were participants of the Study on Aging and Longevity, in Londrina, state of Parana. The number of natural teeth and use of prostheses were evaluated according to the World Health Organization criteria. The presence of CO was assessed using measures of waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). Information concerning sociodemographic profile and some systemic conditions was also collected. Data were analyzed using stepwise logistic regression, α=5%. According to WC and WHR measures, the prevalence of central obesity was 79.3% and 76.1%, respectively. CO according to WC was not associated with oral status. Considering the WHR measure, the following oral conditions were associated to CO: having fewer natural teeth (OR = 2.61; 95%CI = 1.17-5.80), being edentulous and wearing both upper and lower complete dentures (OR = 2.34; 95%CI = 1.11-4.93), and being edentulous wearing only the upper complete denture (OR = 2.64; 95%CI = 1.01-6.95). Traditional risk factors for CO such as gender, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were associated with both measures. A poor oral health due to extensive tooth loss, whether partial or complete, even if rehabilitated by removable prostheses, may be considered a good predictor of CO in Brazilian independent-living elderly.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 54%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 17 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,112,168
of 11,403,395 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Oral Research
#121
of 149 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,358
of 262,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Oral Research
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 149 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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