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Pitted terrains on (1) Ceres and implications for shallow subsurface volatile distribution

Overview of attention for article published in Geophysical Research Letters, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
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Title
Pitted terrains on (1) Ceres and implications for shallow subsurface volatile distribution
Published in
Geophysical Research Letters, July 2017
DOI 10.1002/2017gl073970
Pubmed ID
Authors

H. G. Sizemore, T. Platz, N. Schorghofer, T. H. Prettyman, M. C. De Sanctis, D. A. Crown, N. Schmedemann, A. Neesemann, T. Kneissl, S. Marchi, P. M. Schenk, M. T. Bland, B. E. Schmidt, K. H. G. Hughson, F. Tosi, F. Zambon, S. C. Mest, R. A. Yingst, D. A. Williams, C. T. Russell, C. A. Raymond

Abstract

Prior to the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft at Ceres, the dwarf planet was anticipated to be ice-rich. Searches for morphological features related to ice have been ongoing during Dawn's mission at Ceres. Here we report the identification of pitted terrains associated with fresh Cerean impact craters. The Cerean pitted terrains exhibit strong morphological similarities to pitted materials previously identified on Mars (where ice is implicated in pit development) and Vesta (where the presence of ice is debated). We employ numerical models to investigate the formation of pitted materials on Ceres and discuss the relative importance of water ice and other volatiles in pit development there. We conclude that water ice likely plays an important role in pit development on Ceres. Similar pitted terrains may be common in the asteroid belt and may be of interest to future missions motivated by both astrobiology and in situ resource utilization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 44%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Unspecified 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 44%
Unspecified 5 28%
Physics and Astronomy 2 11%
Engineering 2 11%
Chemistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2019.
All research outputs
#324,360
of 13,635,041 outputs
Outputs from Geophysical Research Letters
#842
of 13,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,815
of 264,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Geophysical Research Letters
#49
of 393 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,635,041 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,481 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,107 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 393 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.