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Mycotoxigenic Fungi

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Cover of 'Mycotoxigenic Fungi'

Table of Contents

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    Book Overview
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    Chapter 1 Mycotoxins: An Underhand Food Problem
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    Chapter 2 Alternaria Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
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    Chapter 3 Aspergillus Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
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    Chapter 4 Fusarium Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
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    Chapter 5 Penicillium Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
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    Chapter 6 Targeting Conserved Genes in Alternaria Species
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    Chapter 7 Targeting Conserved Genes in Aspergillus Species
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    Chapter 8 Targeting Conserved Genes in Fusarium Species
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    Chapter 9 Targeting Conserved Genes in Penicillium Species
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    Chapter 10 Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes
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    Chapter 11 Targeting Trichothecene Biosynthetic Genes
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    Chapter 12 Targeting Ochratoxin Biosynthetic Genes
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    Chapter 13 Targeting Fumonisin Biosynthetic Genes
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    Chapter 14 Targeting Other Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Genes
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    Chapter 15 Evaluating Aflatoxin Gene Expression in Aspergillus Section Flavi
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    Chapter 16 Evaluating Fumonisin Gene Expression in Fusarium verticillioides
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    Chapter 17 Multiplex Detection of Aspergillus Species
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    Chapter 18 Multiplex Detection of Fusarium Species
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    Chapter 19 Multiplex Detection of Toxigenic Penicillium Species
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    Chapter 20 PCR-RFLP for Aspergillus Species
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    Chapter 21 PCR ITS-RFLP for Penicillium Species and Other Genera
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    Chapter 22 Identification of Ochratoxin A-Producing Black Aspergilli from Grapes Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assays
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    Chapter 23 Detection of Transcriptionally Active Mycotoxin Gene Clusters: DNA Microarray
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    Chapter 24 Mycotoxins: A Fungal Genomics Perspective
Attention for Chapter 2: Alternaria Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
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Chapter title
Alternaria Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins
Chapter number 2
Book title
Mycotoxigenic Fungi
Published in
Methods in molecular biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4939-6707-0_2
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-1-4939-6705-6, 978-1-4939-6707-0
Authors

Virginia Elena Fernández Pinto, Andrea Patriarca

Abstract

The genus Alternaria includes more than 250 species. The traditional methods for identification of Alternaria species are based on morphological characteristics of the reproductive structures and sporulation patterns under controlled culture conditions. Cladistics analyses of "housekeeping genes" commonly used for other genera, failed to discriminate among the small-spored Alternaria species. The development of molecular methods achieving a better agreement with morphological differences is still needed. The production of secondary metabolites has also been used as a means of classification and identification. Alternaria spp. can produce a wide variety of toxic metabolites. These metabolites belong principally to three different structural groups: (1) the dibenzopyrone derivatives, alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), and altenuene (ALT); (2) the perylene derivative altertoxins (ATX-I, ATX-II, and ATX II); and (3) the tetramic acid derivative, tenuazonic acid (TeA). TeA, AOH, AME, ALT, and ATX-I are the main. Certain species in the genus Alternaria produce host-specific toxins (HSTs) that contribute to their pathogenicity and virulence. Alternaria species are plant pathogens that cause spoilage of agricultural commodities with consequent mycotoxin accumulation and economic losses. Vegetable foods infected by Alternaria rot could introduce high amounts of these toxins to the human diet. More investigations on the toxic potential of these toxins and their hazard for human consumption are needed to make a reliable risk assessment of dietary exposure.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Professor 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 6 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Engineering 1 5%
Unknown 6 32%