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Plasma and Dietary Carotenoids, and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
29 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
168 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Plasma and Dietary Carotenoids, and the Risk of Prostate Cancer
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2004
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-03-0012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kana Wu, John W. Erdman, Steven J. Schwartz, Elizabeth A. Platz, Michael Leitzmann, Steven K. Clinton, Valerie DeGroff, Walter C. Willett, Edward Giovannucci

Abstract

The association between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer risk was investigated in a case-control study nested within the prospective Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We matched 450 incident prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 1993-1998 to 450 controls by age, time, month, and year of blood donation. Modest inverse, but not statistically significant, associations were observed among plasma alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene concentrations, and overall risk of prostate cancer diagnosis [odds ratio (highest versus lowest quintile; OR), alpha-carotene: OR, 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.40-1.09]; beta-carotene: OR, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.48-1.25); lycopene: OR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.38-1.13)]. The inverse association between plasma lycopene concentrations and prostate cancer risk was limited to participants who were 65 years or older (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23-0.98) and without a family history of prostate cancer (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89). Combining, older age and a negative family history provided similar results (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.18-1.02). Inverse associations between beta-carotene and prostate cancer risk were also found among younger participants (<65 years of age; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.91; P(trend) = 0.03). Combining dietary intake and plasma data confirmed our results. We found a statistically significant inverse association between higher plasma lycopene concentrations and lower risk of prostate cancer, which was restricted to older participants and those without a family history of prostate cancer. This observation suggests that tomato products may exhibit more potent protection against sporadic prostate cancer rather than those with a stronger familial or hereditary component. In addition, our findings also suggest that among younger men, diets rich in beta-carotene may also play a protective role in prostate carcinogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 5%
Unknown 73 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Professor 8 10%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 18 23%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Chemical Engineering 3 4%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 104. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2022.
All research outputs
#302,449
of 21,321,610 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#118
of 4,312 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,897
of 199,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,312 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.