↓ Skip to main content

Decreasing cloud cover drives the recent mass loss on the Greenland Ice Sheet

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
27 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
418 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
Decreasing cloud cover drives the recent mass loss on the Greenland Ice Sheet
Published in
Science Advances, June 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1700584
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Hofer, Andrew J. Tedstone, Xavier Fettweis, Jonathan L. Bamber

Abstract

The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has been losing mass at an accelerating rate since the mid-1990s. This has been due to both increased ice discharge into the ocean and melting at the surface, with the latter being the dominant contribution. This change in state has been attributed to rising temperatures and a decrease in surface albedo. We show, using satellite data and climate model output, that the abrupt reduction in surface mass balance since about 1995 can be attributed largely to a coincident trend of decreasing summer cloud cover enhancing the melt-albedo feedback. Satellite observations show that, from 1995 to 2009, summer cloud cover decreased by 0.9 ± 0.3% per year. Model output indicates that the GrIS summer melt increases by 27 ± 13 gigatons (Gt) per percent reduction in summer cloud cover, principally because of the impact of increased shortwave radiation over the low albedo ablation zone. The observed reduction in cloud cover is strongly correlated with a state shift in the North Atlantic Oscillation promoting anticyclonic conditions in summer and suggests that the enhanced surface mass loss from the GrIS is driven by synoptic-scale changes in Arctic-wide atmospheric circulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 418 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 37%
Researcher 19 29%
Student > Master 7 11%
Professor 5 8%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 41 63%
Environmental Science 9 14%
Unspecified 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 590. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2019.
All research outputs
#10,731
of 12,964,571 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#122
of 2,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#584
of 264,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#9
of 222 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,964,571 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,863 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 125.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 222 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.