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Vision screening of older drivers for preventing road traffic injuries and fatalities

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
175 Mendeley
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Title
Vision screening of older drivers for preventing road traffic injuries and fatalities
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2014
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd006252.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ediriweera Desapriya, Rahana Harjee, Jeffrey Brubacher, Herbert Chan, D Sesath Hewapathirane, Sayed Subzwari, Ian Pike

Abstract

Demographic data in North America, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand suggest a rapid growth in the number of persons over the age of 65 years as the baby boomer generation passes retirement age. As older adults make up an increasing proportion of the population, they are an important consideration when designing future evidence-based traffic safety policies, particularly those that lead to restrictions or cessation of driving. Research has shown that cessation of driving among older drivers can lead to negative emotional consequences such as depression and loss of independence. Older adults who continue to drive tend to do so less frequently than other demographic groups and are more likely to be involved in a road traffic crash, possibly due to what is termed the "low mileage bias". Available research suggests that older driver crash risk estimates based on traditional exposure measures are prone to bias. When annual driving distances are taken in to consideration, older drivers with low driving distances have an increased crash risk, while those with average or high driving distances tend to be safer drivers when compared to other age groups. In addition, older drivers with lower distance driving tend to drive in urban areas which, due to more complex and demanding traffic patterns, tend to be more accident-prone. Failure to control for actual annual driving distances and driving locations among older drivers is referred to as "low mileage bias" in older driver mobility research. It is also important to note that older drivers are more vulnerable to serious injury and death in the event of a traffic crash due to changes in physiology associated with normal ageing. Vision, cognition, and motor functions or skills (e.g., strength, co-ordination, and flexibility) are three key domains required for safe driving. To drive safely, an individual needs to be able to see road signs, road side objects, traffic lights, roadway markings, other vulnerable road users, and other vehicles on the road, among many other cues-all while moving, and under varying light and weather conditions. It is equally important that drivers must have appropriate peripheral vision to monitor objects and movement to identify possible threats in the driving environment. It is, therefore, not surprising that there is agreement among researchers that vision plays a significant role in driving performance. Several age-related processes/conditions impair vision, thus it follows that vision testing of older drivers is an important road safety issue. The components of visual function essential for driving are acuity, static acuity, dynamic acuity, visual fields, visual attention, depth perception, and contrast sensitivity. These indices are typically not fully assessed by licensing agencies. Also, current vision screening regulations and cut-off values required to pass a licensing test vary from country to country. Although there is a clear need to develop evidence-based and validated tools for vision screening for driving, the effectiveness of existing vision screening tools remains unclear. This represents an important and highly warranted initiative to increase road safety worldwide.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 175 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Kazakhstan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 170 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 17%
Researcher 28 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 15%
Student > Bachelor 23 13%
Librarian 9 5%
Other 37 21%
Unknown 23 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 13%
Psychology 13 7%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Other 30 17%
Unknown 35 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2019.
All research outputs
#462,763
of 14,064,239 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,360
of 10,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,458
of 188,575 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#37
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,064,239 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,575 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.