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Fate and redistribution of perfluoroalkyl acids through AFFF-impacted groundwater

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2017
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52 Mendeley
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Title
Fate and redistribution of perfluoroalkyl acids through AFFF-impacted groundwater
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.095
Pubmed ID
URN
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57896
Authors

Jennifer Bräunig, Christine Baduel, Amy Heffernan, Anna Rotander, Eric Donaldson, Jochen F. Mueller

Abstract

Leaching of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from a local point source, a fire-fighting training area, has led to extensive contamination of a groundwater aquifer which has spread underneath part of a nearby town, Oakey, situated in the State of Queensland, Australia. Groundwater is extracted by residents from privately owned wells for daily activities such as watering livestock and garden beds. The concentration of 10 PFAAs in environmental and biological samples (water, soil, grass, chicken egg yolk, serum of horses, cattle and sheep), as well as human serum was investigated to determine the extent of contamination in the town and discuss fate and redistribution of PFAAs. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the dominant PFAA in all matrices investigated, followed by perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS). PFOS concentrations measured in water ranged between <0.17-14μg/L, concentrations of PFHxS measured between <0.07-6μg/L. PFAAs were detected in backyards (soil, grass), livestock and chicken egg yolk. Significant differences (p<0.01) in PFOS and PFHxS concentrations in two groups of cattle were found, one held within the contamination plume, the other in the vicinity but outside of the contamination plume. In human serum PFOS concentrations ranged from 38 to 381μg/L, while PFHxS ranged from 39 to 214μg/L. Highest PFOS concentrations measured in human serum were >30-fold higher compared to the general Australian population. Through use of contaminated groundwater secondary sources of PFAA contamination are created on private property, leading to further redistribution of contamination and creation of additional human exposure pathways.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 15%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 29%
Unspecified 13 25%
Engineering 9 17%
Chemistry 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Other 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,667,469
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#5,348
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,639
of 267,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#64
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,691 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.