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Climate change alters the trophic niche of a declining apex marine predator

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
37 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
Title
Climate change alters the trophic niche of a declining apex marine predator
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12554
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bond, Alexander L., Lavers, Jennifer L.

Abstract

Changes in the world's oceans have altered nutrient flow, and affected the viability of predator populations when prey species become unavailable. These changes are integrated into the tissues of apex predators over space and time and can be quantified using stable isotopes in the inert feathers of historical and contemporary avian specimens. We measured δ(13) C and δ(15) N values in Flesh-footed Shearwaters (Puffinus carneipes) from Western and South Australia from 1936-2011. The Flesh-footed Shearwaters more than doubled their trophic niche (from 3.91 ± 1.37 ‰(2) to 10.00 ± 1.79 ‰(2) ), and dropped an entire trophic level in 75 years (predicted δ(15) N decreased from +16.9 ‰ to + 13.5 ‰, and δ(13) C from -16.9 ‰ to -17.9 ‰) - the largest change in δ(15) N yet reported in any marine bird, suggesting a relatively rapid shift in the composition of the Indian Ocean food web, or changes in baseline δ(13) C and δ(15) N values. A stronger El Niño-Southern Oscillation results in a weaker Leeuwin Current in Western Australia, and decreased Flesh-footed Shearwater δ(13) C and δ(15) N. Current climate forecasts predict this trend to continue, leading to increased oceanic 'tropicalization' and potentially competition between Flesh-footed Shearwaters and more tropical sympatric species with expanding ranges. Flesh-footed Shearwater populations are declining, and current conservation measures aimed primarily at bycatch mitigation are not restoring populations. Widespread shifts in foraging, as shown here, may explain some of the reported decline. An improved understanding and ability to mitigate the impacts of global climactic changes is therefore critical to the long-term sustainability of this declining species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Namibia 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 95 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 31 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 28%
Student > Master 15 14%
Unspecified 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 57%
Environmental Science 23 22%
Unspecified 15 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 5%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2017.
All research outputs
#315,555
of 12,194,389 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#344
of 3,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,460
of 195,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#11
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,194,389 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.