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Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands: A synthesis of methylmercury production, hydrologic export, and bioaccumulation from an integrated field study

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, June 2014
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2 tweeters

Citations

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74 Dimensions

Readers on

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131 Mendeley
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Title
Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands: A synthesis of methylmercury production, hydrologic export, and bioaccumulation from an integrated field study
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, June 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.01.033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Jacob A. Fleck, Joshua T. Ackerman, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale, Craig A. Stricker, Wesley A. Heim, Philip A.M. Bachand, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Gary Gill, Mark Stephenson, Charles N. Alpers

Abstract

With seasonal wetting and drying, and high biological productivity, agricultural wetlands (rice paddies) may enhance the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) to methylmercury (MeHg), the more toxic, organic form that biomagnifies through food webs. Yet, the net balance of MeHg sources and sinks in seasonal wetland environments is poorly understood because it requires an annual, integrated assessment across biota, sediment, and water components. We examined a suite of wetlands managed for rice crops or wildlife during 2007-2008 in California's Central Valley, in an area affected by Hg contamination from historic mining practices. Hydrologic management of agricultural wetlands for rice, wild rice, or fallowed - drying for field preparation and harvest, and flooding for crop growth and post-harvest rice straw decay - led to pronounced seasonality in sediment and aqueous MeHg concentrations that were up to 95-fold higher than those measured concurrently in adjacent, non-agricultural permanently-flooded and seasonally-flooded wetlands. Flooding promoted microbial MeHg production in surface sediment of all wetlands, but extended water residence time appeared to preferentially enhance MeHg degradation and storage. When incoming MeHg loads were elevated, individual fields often served as a MeHg sink, rather than a source. Slow, horizontal flow of shallow water in the agricultural wetlands led to increased importance of vertical hydrologic fluxes, including evapoconcentration of surface water MeHg and transpiration-driven advection into the root zone, promoting temporary soil storage of MeHg. Although this hydrology limited MeHg export from wetlands, it also increased MeHg exposure to resident fish via greater in situ aqueous MeHg concentrations. Our results suggest that the combined traits of agricultural wetlands - slow-moving shallow water, manipulated flooding and drying, abundant labile plant matter, and management for wildlife - may enhance microbial methylation of Hg(II) and MeHg exposure to local biota, as well as export to downstream habitats during uncontrolled winter-flow events.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 124 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 18%
Student > Master 21 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 10%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 20 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 8%
Chemistry 8 6%
Engineering 5 4%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 22 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2015.
All research outputs
#9,902,184
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#9,187
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,598
of 190,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#80
of 152 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 152 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.