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Yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein from measles virus vaccine as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver Plasmodium circumsporozoite antigen

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein from measles virus vaccine as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver Plasmodium circumsporozoite antigen
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1908-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daria Jacob, Claude Ruffie, Chantal Combredet, Pauline Formaglio, Rogerio Amino, Robert Ménard, Frédéric Tangy, Monica Sala

Abstract

Yeast cells represent an established bioreactor to produce recombinant proteins for subunit vaccine development. In addition, delivery of vaccine antigens directly within heat-inactivated yeast cells is attractive due to the adjuvancy provided by the yeast cell. In this study, Pichia pastoris yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein (N) from the measles vaccine virus were evaluated as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver the circumsporozoite surface antigen (CS) of Plasmodium. When expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast, the N protein auto-assembles into highly multimeric ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). The CS antigen from Plasmodium berghei (PbCS) was expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast in fusion with N, generating recombinant PbCS-carrying RNPs in the cytoplasm of yeast cells. When evaluated in mice after 3-5 weekly subcutaneous injections, yeast lysates containing N-PbCS RNPs elicited strong anti-PbCS humoral responses, which were PbCS-dose dependent and reached a plateau by the pre-challenge time point. Protective efficacy of yeast lysates was dose-dependent, although anti-PbCS antibody titers were not predictive of protection. Multimerization of PbCS on RNPs was essential for providing benefit against infection, as immunization with monomeric PbCS delivered in yeast lysates was not protective. Three weekly injections with N-PbCS yeast lysates in combination with alum adjuvant produced sterile protection in two out of six mice, and significantly reduced parasitaemia in the other individuals from the same group. This parasitaemia decrease was of the same extent as in mice immunized with non-adjuvanted N-PbCS yeast lysates, providing evidence that the yeast lysate formulation did not require accessory adjuvants for eliciting efficient parasitaemia reduction. This study demonstrates that yeast lysates are an attractive auto-adjuvant and efficient platform for delivering multimeric PbCS on measles N-based RNPs. By combining yeast lysates that carry RNPs with a large panel of Plasmodium antigens, this technology could be applied to developing a multivalent vaccine against malaria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Master 2 22%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 22%
Chemistry 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,526,787
of 14,574,667 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,208
of 4,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,118
of 266,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,667 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,486 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them