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Service Quality Assessment of Hospitals in Asian Context: An Empirical Evidence From Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in "Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing", June 2017
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Service Quality Assessment of Hospitals in Asian Context: An Empirical Evidence From Pakistan
Published in
"Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing", June 2017
DOI 10.1177/0046958017714664
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Azhar Naeem, Zartasha Munawar, Iram Fatima

Abstract

Hospitals vary from one another in terms of their specialty, services offered, and resource availability. Their services are widely measured with scales that gauge patients' perspective. Therefore, there is a need for research to develop a scale that measures hospital service quality in Asian hospitals, regardless of their nature or ownership. To address this research need, this study adapted the SERVQUAL instrument to develop a service quality measurement scale. Data were collected from inpatients and outpatients at 9 different hospitals, and the scale was developed using structural equation modeling. The developed scale was then validated by identifying service quality gaps and ranking the areas that require managerial effort. The findings indicated that all 5 dimensions of SERVQUAL are valid in Asian countries such as Pakistan, with 13 items retained. Reliability, tangibility, responsiveness, empathy, and assurance were ranked first, second, third, fourth, and fifth, respectively, in terms of the size of the quality gap. The gaps were statistically significant, with values ≤.05; therefore, hospital administrators must focus on each of these areas. By focusing on the identified areas of improvement, health care authorities, managers, practitioners, and decision makers can bring substantial change within hospitals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 29%
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Other 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 29%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,112,158
of 11,411,580 outputs
Outputs from "Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing"
#103
of 133 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,832
of 260,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age from "Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing"
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,411,580 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,963 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them