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Change deafness for real spatialized environmental scenes

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, June 2017
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Title
Change deafness for real spatialized environmental scenes
Published in
Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41235-017-0066-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy Gaston, Kelly Dickerson, Daniel Hipp, Peter Gerhardstein

Abstract

The everyday auditory environment is complex and dynamic; often, multiple sounds co-occur and compete for a listener's cognitive resources. 'Change deafness', framed as the auditory analog to the well-documented phenomenon of 'change blindness', describes the finding that changes presented within complex environments are often missed. The present study examines a number of stimulus factors that may influence change deafness under real-world listening conditions. Specifically, an AX (same-different) discrimination task was used to examine the effects of both spatial separation over a loudspeaker array and the type of change (sound source additions and removals) on discrimination of changes embedded in complex backgrounds. Results using signal detection theory and accuracy analyses indicated that, under most conditions, errors were significantly reduced for spatially distributed relative to non-spatial scenes. A second goal of the present study was to evaluate a possible link between memory for scene contents and change discrimination. Memory was evaluated by presenting a cued recall test following each trial of the discrimination task. Results using signal detection theory and accuracy analyses indicated that recall ability was similar in terms of accuracy, but there were reductions in sensitivity compared to previous reports. Finally, the present study used a large and representative sample of outdoor, urban, and environmental sounds, presented in unique combinations of nearly 1000 trials per participant. This enabled the exploration of the relationship between change perception and the perceptual similarity between change targets and background scene sounds. These (post hoc) analyses suggest both a categorical and a stimulus-level relationship between scene similarity and the magnitude of change errors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 40%
Professor 1 20%
Researcher 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1 20%
Social Sciences 1 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%
Unknown 2 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,124,067
of 11,409,342 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#78
of 83 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,691
of 260,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,409,342 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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