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Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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86 Mendeley
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Title
Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout
Published in
Molecular Ecology, July 2017
DOI 10.1111/mec.14225
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zachary L. Robinson, Jason A. Coombs, Mark Hudy, Keith H. Nislow, Benjamin H. Letcher, Andrew R. Whiteley

Abstract

Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g. outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 out of 40 (78%) of translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating, and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness, and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigor was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue motivated translocations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 86 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Professor 3 3%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 49%
Environmental Science 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 13%
Unspecified 3 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 16 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,444,273
of 13,967,998 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#976
of 4,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,190
of 265,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#40
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,967,998 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,351 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.