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Migratory blackpoll warblers (Setophaga striata) make regional-scale movements that are not oriented toward their migratory goal during fall

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 157)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Migratory blackpoll warblers (Setophaga striata) make regional-scale movements that are not oriented toward their migratory goal during fall
Published in
Movement Ecology, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40462-017-0106-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Morgan Brown, Philip D. Taylor

Abstract

Regional scale movement patterns of songbirds are poorly known largely due to difficulties tracking small organisms at broad scales. Using an array of over 100 automated radio telemetry towers, we followed Blackpoll Warblers (Setophaga striata) during fall migration in the Gulf of Maine region, and assessed how their regional scale movement pathways varied with age, distance to natal origin, and capture date. Many individuals had movement paths that were not oriented towards their migratory goal ('indirect movement patterns'), regardless of age, distance to natal origin, or time of season. The probability of moving in indirect patterns, and the total tracking duration, decreased with capture date. The extent of indirect movement patterns varied considerably between individuals. Excluding direct flight patterns consistent with traditional migratory movements, adults tended to make more flights and moved in more tortuous patterns than hatch-years. Adults and individuals from more westerly natal origins were more likely to move south-west through time. A greater proportion of individuals made movements that were not oriented towards the migratory than expected. A decrease in tracking duration with capture date indicates that individuals prioritize time as the season progresses. The shorter, indirect movement patterns may be a more complete representation of 'reverse migration' at a barrier or 'landscape-scale stopovers movements'. The longer distances travelled are inconsistent with expected behaviour, even in front of a barrier. The extent of movement we observed indirectly suggests that flight is not as costly to individuals in a migratory state as is commonly assumed. Since adults were observed to move more than hatch-years, we suggest that the indirect movement patterns we observed are not accidental, and may provide some advantage to the individuals that undertake them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 24%
Researcher 7 17%
Other 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 55%
Environmental Science 12 29%
Computer Science 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#695,793
of 13,565,336 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#23
of 157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,287
of 265,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,565,336 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them