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Associations Between Parental Factors and Child Diabetes-Management–Related Behaviors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, May 2017
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Associations Between Parental Factors and Child Diabetes-Management–Related Behaviors
Published in
Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, May 2017
DOI 10.1097/dbp.0000000000000447
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lohan, Aditi, Morawska, Alina, Mitchell, Amy

Abstract

Adherence to diabetes-management regimens in children requires teamwork and consistency from both parents and children. This study investigated a mediational model developed to understand the relationship between different modifiable parent factors influencing child diabetes-related behaviors. We recruited 186 parents of children aged 2 to 10 years with Type 1 diabetes to complete self-report questionnaires on child diabetes behavior, parental self-efficacy with managing the child's behavior, parent diabetes self-efficacy, parent adjustment, condition management effort, parent perception of their diabetes knowledge, and parenting behavior. We used structural equation modeling in AMOS to test our hypothesized model of interrelationships between variables associated with child diabetes behavior. The hypothesized model provided good fit to the data. We found that parent perception of low levels of diabetes knowledge and higher levels of condition management effort, and parent adjustment difficulties were associated with lower parental self-efficacy with diabetes management. This was further linked with lower levels of parental self-efficacy with managing their child's diabetes behavior, and consequently, higher extent of child diabetes behavior problems. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find a significant effect of parenting behavior on child diabetes behavior problems, either directly or indirectly via parent self-efficacy for managing child's behavior. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms through which different parenting factors interact and are associated with diabetes behavior in children. These factors can be targeted through parenting interventions to improve child's cooperation with diabetes-management tasks and reduce barriers to effective management.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 27%
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Researcher 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,335,534
of 11,653,629 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
#1,221
of 1,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,691
of 264,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
#20
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,653,629 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,532 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.