↓ Skip to main content

Life history constraints explain negative relationship between fish productivity and dissolved organic carbon in lakes

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Life history constraints explain negative relationship between fish productivity and dissolved organic carbon in lakes
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, July 2017
DOI 10.1002/ece3.3108
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Craig, Stuart E. Jones, Brian C. Weidel, Christopher T. Solomon

Abstract

Resource availability constrains the life history strategies available to organisms and may thereby limit population growth rates and productivity. We used this conceptual framework to explore the mechanisms driving recently reported negative relationships between fish productivity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in lakes. We studied populations of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in a set of lakes with DOC concentrations ranging from 3 to 24 mg/L; previous work has demonstrated that primary and secondary productivity of food webs is negatively related to DOC concentration across this gradient. For each population, we quantified individual growth rate, age at maturity, age-specific fecundity, maximum age, length-weight and length-egg size relationships, and other life history characteristics. We observed a strong negative relationship between maximum size and DOC concentration; for instance, fish reached masses of 150 to 260 g in low-DOC lakes but <120 g in high-DOC lakes. Relationships between fecundity and length, and between egg size and length, were constant across the DOC gradient. Because fish in high-DOC lakes reached smaller sizes but had similar fecundity and egg size at a given size, their total lifetime fecundity was as much as two orders of magnitude lower than fish in low-DOC lakes. High DOC concentrations appeared to constrain the range of bluegill life history strategies available; populations in high-DOC lakes always had low initial growth rates and high ages at maturity, whereas populations in low-DOC showed higher variability in these traits. This was also the case for the intrinsic rates of natural increase of these populations, which were always low at the high end of the DOC gradient. The potentially lower capacity for fish populations in high-DOC lakes to recover from exploitation has clear implications for the sustainable management of recreational fisheries in the face of considerable spatial heterogeneity and ongoing temporal change in lake DOC concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 8 17%
Other 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 19 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 34%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2017.
All research outputs
#1,625,222
of 11,551,802 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#791
of 2,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,436
of 262,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#66
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,551,802 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,976 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.