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Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A 1 -to-A 2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A 1 -to-A 2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, July 2017
DOI 10.1098/rsos.170362
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ala Morshedian, Matthew B. Toomey, Gabriel E. Pollock, Rikard Frederiksen, Jennifer M. Enright, Stephen D. McCormick, M. Carter Cornwall, Gordon L. Fain, Joseph C. Corbo

Abstract

The spectral composition of ambient light varies across both space and time. Many species of jawed vertebrates adapt to this variation by tuning the sensitivity of their photoreceptors via the expression of CYP27C1, an enzyme that converts vitamin A1 into vitamin A2, thereby shifting the ratio of vitamin A1-based rhodopsin to red-shifted vitamin A2-based porphyropsin in the eye. Here, we show that the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates during the Cambrian period (approx. 500 Ma), dynamically shifts its photoreceptor spectral sensitivity via vitamin A1-to-A2 chromophore exchange as it transitions between photically divergent aquatic habitats. We further show that this shift correlates with high-level expression of the lamprey orthologue of CYP27C1, specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium as in jawed vertebrates. Our results suggest that the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism of sensory plasticity that appeared not long after the origin of vertebrates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 24%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Neuroscience 2 12%
Engineering 1 6%
Unknown 2 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,033,108
of 13,247,762 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#1,154
of 2,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,275
of 263,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#68
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,247,762 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,088 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.5. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.