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Bridging the digital disconnect: Exploring the views of professionals on using technology to promote young people’s mental health

Overview of attention for article published in School Psychology International, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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Title
Bridging the digital disconnect: Exploring the views of professionals on using technology to promote young people’s mental health
Published in
School Psychology International, April 2017
DOI 10.1177/0143034317700937
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aleisha M. Clarke, Derek Chambers, Margaret M. Barry

Abstract

The increasing role of online technologies in young people's lives has significant implications for professionals' engagement with technologies to promote youth mental health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about professionals' views on the role of technologies in supporting youth mental health. This article outlines key findings from a needs assessment survey carried out in Ireland that sought to determine the views of professionals working with young people on the use of online technologies in supporting young people's mental health and well-being. A total of 900 professionals from across the education, health, and mental health professions completed an online survey. The findings demonstrate the importance of the internet as a resource for professionals working with young people, with over 98% of those surveyed expressing a readiness to use online resources to support young people's mental health. The nature of preferred online technologies differed according to professional groupings, however, 63% of overall respondents indicated they would look for help on a dedicated mental health website. Guidelines on working with young people and their parents on the promotion of positive mental were requested with the most frequency. Among the barriers identified were concerns about access to reliable information that was relevant to specific professional roles, and the need for organizational support of professionals' use of online evidence-based resources. Concerns were also expressed that online resources could replace face-to-face support services for young people, and the need for training professionals in their appropriate use. The results highlight the potential role of technology in assisting professionals through the provision of online training, reliable information, and practical resources on the promotion of positive youth mental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 22%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Computer Science 6 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Arts and Humanities 4 6%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 15 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,489,517
of 15,226,654 outputs
Outputs from School Psychology International
#52
of 307 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,414
of 266,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from School Psychology International
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,226,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 307 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.