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Is weight gain really a catalyst for broader recovery?: The impact of weight gain on psychological symptoms in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa

Overview of attention for article published in Behaviour Research & Therapy, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
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1 research highlight platform

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Is weight gain really a catalyst for broader recovery?: The impact of weight gain on psychological symptoms in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa
Published in
Behaviour Research & Therapy, February 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2014.02.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Accurso EC, Ciao AC, Fitzsimmons-Craft EE, Lock JD, Le Grange D, Erin C. Accurso, Anna C. Ciao, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, James D. Lock, Daniel Le Grange

Abstract

The main aims of this study were to describe change in psychological outcomes for adolescents with anorexia nervosa across two treatments, and to explore predictors of change, including baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as weight gain over time. Participants were 121 adolescents with anorexia nervosa from a two-site (Chicago and Stanford) randomized controlled trial who received either family-based treatment or individual adolescent supportive psychotherapy. Psychological symptoms (i.e., eating disorder psychopathology, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem) were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Conditional multilevel growth models were used to test for predictors of slope for each outcome. Most psychological symptoms improved significantly from baseline to 12 month follow-up, regardless of treatment type. Depressive symptoms and dietary restraint were most improved, weight and shape concerns were least improved, and self-esteem was not at all improved. Weight gain emerged as a significant predictor of improved eating disorder pathology, with earlier weight gain having a greater impact on symptom improvement than later weight gain. Adolescents who presented with more severe, complex, and enduring clinical presentations (i.e., longer duration of illness, greater eating disorder pathology, binge-eating/purging subtype) also appeared to benefit more psychologically from treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 4%
France 1 4%
Unknown 23 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Other 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2016.
All research outputs
#793,915
of 8,223,523 outputs
Outputs from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#204
of 1,439 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,656
of 177,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,223,523 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,439 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.