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Should Potential Risk of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Be Discussed with Young Athletes?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, July 2017
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57 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Should Potential Risk of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Be Discussed with Young Athletes?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, July 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.7.pfor1-1707
Pubmed ID
Abstract

As participation in youth sports has risen over the past two decades, so has the incidence of youth sports injuries. A common topic of concern is concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, in young athletes and whether concussions sustained at a young age could lead to lifelong impairment such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While the pathway from a concussed young athlete to an adult with CTE remains unknown, current research is attempting to provide more clarity. This article discusses how health care professionals can help foster an informed, balanced decision-making process regarding participation in contact sports that involves the parents as well as the children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 24%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 31%
Psychology 6 12%
Sports and Recreations 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 11 22%