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Low Protein Intake Is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and Overall Mortality in the 65 and Younger but Not Older Population

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Metabolism (Science Direct), March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 2,178)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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306 Dimensions

Readers on

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839 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
Low Protein Intake Is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and Overall Mortality in the 65 and Younger but Not Older Population
Published in
Cell Metabolism (Science Direct), March 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.02.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Morgan E. Levine, Jorge A. Suarez, Sebastian Brandhorst, Priya Balasubramanian, Chia-Wei Cheng, Federica Madia, Luigi Fontana, Mario G. Mirisola, Jaime Guevara-Aguirre, Junxiang Wan, Giuseppe Passarino, Brian K. Kennedy, Min Wei, Pinchas Cohen, Eileen M. Crimmins, Valter D. Longo

Abstract

Mice and humans with growth hormone receptor/IGF-1 deficiencies display major reductions in age-related diseases. Because protein restriction reduces GHR-IGF-1 activity, we examined links between protein intake and mortality. Respondents aged 50-65 reporting high protein intake had a 75% increase in overall mortality and a 4-fold increase in cancer death risk during the following 18 years. These associations were either abolished or attenuated if the proteins were plant derived. Conversely, high protein intake was associated with reduced cancer and overall mortality in respondents over 65, but a 5-fold increase in diabetes mortality across all ages. Mouse studies confirmed the effect of high protein intake and GHR-IGF-1 signaling on the incidence and progression of breast and melanoma tumors, but also the detrimental effects of a low protein diet in the very old. These results suggest that low protein intake during middle age followed by moderate to high protein consumption in old adults may optimize healthspan and longevity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 781 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 839 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 15 2%
Australia 7 <1%
Brazil 6 <1%
Japan 6 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
Netherlands 4 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Other 19 2%
Unknown 766 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 163 19%
Student > Master 136 16%
Researcher 134 16%
Student > Bachelor 100 12%
Unspecified 67 8%
Other 239 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 244 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 204 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 101 12%
Unspecified 88 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 40 5%
Other 162 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1699. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,182
of 13,535,861 outputs
Outputs from Cell Metabolism (Science Direct)
#5
of 2,178 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13
of 187,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Metabolism (Science Direct)
#1
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,535,861 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,178 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.