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Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 91,075)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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874 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2661 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1704949114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerardo Ceballos, Paul R. Ehrlich, Rodolfo Dirzo

Abstract

The population extinction pulse we describe here shows, from a quantitative viewpoint, that Earth's sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions. Therefore, humanity needs to address anthropogenic population extirpation and decimation immediately. That conclusion is based on analyses of the numbers and degrees of range contraction (indicative of population shrinkage and/or population extinctions according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature) using a sample of 27,600 vertebrate species, and on a more detailed analysis documenting the population extinctions between 1900 and 2015 in 177 mammal species. We find that the rate of population loss in terrestrial vertebrates is extremely high-even in "species of low concern." In our sample, comprising nearly half of known vertebrate species, 32% (8,851/27,600) are decreasing; that is, they have decreased in population size and range. In the 177 mammals for which we have detailed data, all have lost 30% or more of their geographic ranges and more than 40% of the species have experienced severe population declines (>80% range shrinkage). Our data indicate that beyond global species extinctions Earth is experiencing a huge episode of population declines and extirpations, which will have negative cascading consequences on ecosystem functioning and services vital to sustaining civilization. We describe this as a "biological annihilation" to highlight the current magnitude of Earth's ongoing sixth major extinction event.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3,352 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,661 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2661 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 482 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 465 17%
Student > Bachelor 405 15%
Researcher 389 15%
Other 122 5%
Other 386 15%
Unknown 412 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 909 34%
Environmental Science 610 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 148 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 110 4%
Social Sciences 80 3%
Other 300 11%
Unknown 504 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4415. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2021.
All research outputs
#553
of 18,374,253 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#22
of 91,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6
of 275,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2
of 956 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,374,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,107 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 956 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.