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The self-regulated learning of medical students in the clinical environment – a scoping review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
The self-regulated learning of medical students in the clinical environment – a scoping review
Published in
BMC Medical Education, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0956-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth K. Cho, Brahm Marjadi, Vicki Langendyk, Wendy Hu

Abstract

Self-regulated learning is the individual's ability to effectively use various strategies to reach their learning goals. We conducted this scoping review to explore what has been found regarding self-regulated learning in the clinical environment and how this was measured. Using Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework, we searched three medical and educational databases as well as Google Scholar for literature on the self-regulated learning of medical students in the clinical environment published between 1966 and February 2017. After results were screened and relevant studies were identified, the data was summarised and discursively reported. The search resulted in 911 articles, with 14 articles included in the scoping review after the inclusion criteria was applied. Self-regulated learning was explored in these studies in various ways including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. Three major findings were found: 1) levels of self-regulated learning change in the clinical environment, 2) self-regulated learning is associated with academic achievement, success in clinical skills and mental health and 3) various factors can support self-regulated learning levels in medical students. Most of articles exploring the self-regulated learning of medical students during the clinical years have been published in the last 5 years, suggesting a growing interest in the area. Future research could explore the self-regulated learning levels of medical students during the clinical years using a longitudinal approach or through the use of novel qualitative approaches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 135 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 16 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 10%
Other 12 9%
Researcher 11 8%
Other 46 34%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 41%
Social Sciences 16 12%
Psychology 14 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 21 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,988,001
of 15,922,434 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#507
of 2,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,332
of 268,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,434 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,252 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,339 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them