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Control of lupus nephritis by changes of gut microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
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Title
Control of lupus nephritis by changes of gut microbiota
Published in
Microbiome, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-017-0300-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qinghui Mu, Husen Zhang, Xiaofeng Liao, Kaisen Lin, Hualan Liu, Michael R. Edwards, S. Ansar Ahmed, Ruoxi Yuan, Liwu Li, Thomas E. Cecere, David B. Branson, Jay L. Kirby, Poorna Goswami, Caroline M. Leeth, Kaitlin A. Read, Kenneth J. Oestreich, Miranda D. Vieson, Christopher M. Reilly, Xin M. Luo

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus, characterized by persistent inflammation, is a complex autoimmune disorder with no known cure. Immunosuppressants used in treatment put patients at a higher risk of infections. New knowledge of disease modulators, such as symbiotic bacteria, can enable fine-tuning of parts of the immune system, rather than suppressing it altogether. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota promotes autoimmune disorders that damage extraintestinal organs. Here we report a role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction in lupus. Using a classical model of lupus nephritis, MRL/lpr, we found a marked depletion of Lactobacillales in the gut microbiota. Increasing Lactobacillales in the gut improved renal function of these mice and prolonged their survival. We used a mixture of 5 Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus oris, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus gasseri), but L. reuteri and an uncultured Lactobacillus sp. accounted for most of the observed effects. Further studies revealed that MRL/lpr mice possessed a "leaky" gut, which was reversed by increased Lactobacillus colonization. Lactobacillus treatment contributed to an anti-inflammatory environment by decreasing IL-6 and increasing IL-10 production in the gut. In the circulation, Lactobacillus treatment increased IL-10 and decreased IgG2a that is considered to be a major immune deposit in the kidney of MRL/lpr mice. Inside the kidney, Lactobacillus treatment also skewed the Treg-Th17 balance towards a Treg phenotype. These beneficial effects were present in female and castrated male mice, but not in intact males, suggesting that the gut microbiota controls lupus nephritis in a sex hormone-dependent manner. This work demonstrates essential mechanisms on how changes of the gut microbiota regulate lupus-associated immune responses in mice. Future studies are warranted to determine if these results can be replicated in human subjects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Student > Master 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 16 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 13%
Chemistry 5 5%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 16 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 93. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2020.
All research outputs
#210,413
of 15,038,142 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#53
of 844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,939
of 266,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,038,142 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.