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Human health screening and public health significance of contaminants of emerging concern detected in public water supplies

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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Title
Human health screening and public health significance of contaminants of emerging concern detected in public water supplies
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.146
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Benson, Octavia D. Conerly, William Sander, Angela L. Batt, J. Scott Boone, Edward T. Furlong, Susan T. Glassmeyer, Dana W. Kolpin, Heath E. Mash, Kathleen M. Schenck, Jane Ellen Simmons

Abstract

The source water and treated drinking water from twenty five drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) across the United States were sampled in 2010-2012. Samples were analyzed for 247 contaminants using 15 chemical and microbiological methods. Most of these contaminants are not regulated currently either in drinking water or in discharges to ambient water by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) or other U.S. regulatory agencies. This analysis shows that there is little public health concern for most of the contaminants detected in treated water from the 25 DWTPs participating in this study. For vanadium, the calculated Margin of Exposure (MOE) was less than the screening MOE in two DWTPs. For silicon, the calculated MOE was less than the screening MOE in one DWTP. Additional study, for example a national survey may be needed to determine the number of people ingesting vanadium and silicon above a level of concern. In addition, the concentrations of lithium found in treated water from several DWTPs are within the range previous research has suggested to have a human health effect. Additional investigation of this issue is necessary. Finally, new toxicological data suggest that exposure to manganese at levels in public water supplies may present a public health concern which will require a robust assessment of this information.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 163 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 23%
Researcher 25 15%
Student > Master 23 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 27 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 35 21%
Engineering 25 15%
Chemical Engineering 12 7%
Chemistry 12 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Other 31 19%
Unknown 41 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2019.
All research outputs
#5,609,698
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#6,108
of 17,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,571
of 272,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#43
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,040 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,545 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.